News


OregonSaves

Dear Chambers of Commerce, Business Associations, Employer Groups, Trade Associations, and Interested Parties,

Later this month, the Oregon State Treasury will begin sending out notices to employers across the state about its new retirement savings program, OregonSaves. We wanted to make sure you knew that these notices would be going out, and we are hoping you might be able to help us raise awareness about the program’s rollout.

If you have any questions about OregonSaves, please contact our Client Services Team at 844-661-1256 (employer assistance) or 844-661-6777 (employee assistance). You can also email clientservices@oregonsaves.com.

Materials about OregonSaves can be found online at http://www.oregon.gov/retire/Pages/Newsroom.aspx, including an animated video that explains what the program is and how it works, a PowerPoint presentation and recorded webinar, and informational flyers in English, Spanish, and Russian.

The Oregon State Treasury is launching a new program called OregonSaves that may impact your business, clients, and members. OregonSaves is a simple and convenient way for workers to save for retirement. It allows them to save a part of each paycheck through payroll deductions facilitated by their employer and invest their savings in professionally-managed investment options in a Roth individual retirement account. The account is also portable, allowing them to take it with them from job to job.

Any business with employees that does not sponsor a qualified retirement plan* will need to register to facilitate OregonSaves for its employees. The registration process is designed to be simple in order to limit any burden on employers. Employers can choose to offer their own retirement plans to some or all of their employees instead of participating in the program.

The program is scheduled to roll out in phases, and the State will let employers know when their phase will begin. The deadlines for employers to register to facilitate are as follows:

·         An employer employing 100 or more employees: November 15, 2017

·         An employer employing 50 to 99 employees: May 15, 2018

·         An employer employing 20 to 49 employees: December 15, 2018

·         An employer employing 10 to 19 employees: May 15, 2019

·         An employer employing 5 to 9 employees: November 15, 2019

·         An employer employing 4 or fewer employees: May 15, 2020

The State will send a notice about the program to employers approximately six months before their registration deadline. The State will send another notice to employers one month before the deadline with instructions about how to register. Employers will have until the applicable deadline above to complete the registration process.

For more information, including answers to frequently asked questions, visit www.oregonsaves.com or call (844) 661-1256.

*A qualified retirement plan includes a plan qualified under Internal Revenue Code sections 401(a) (including a 401(k) plan), qualified annuity plan under section 403(a), tax-sheltered annuity plan under section 403(b), Simplified Employee Pension plan under section 408(k), a SIMPLE IRA plan under section 408(p) or governmental deferred compensation plan under section 457(b). It does not include payroll deduction IRAs.

OregonSaves is overseen by the Oregon Retirement Savings Board. Ascensus College Savings Recordkeeping Services, LLC (“ACRS”) is the program administrator. ACRS and its affiliates are responsible for day-to-day program operations. Participants saving through OregonSaves beneficially own and have control over their Roth IRAs, as provided in the program offering set out at saver.oregonsaves.com.

OregonSaves’ Portfolios offer investment options selected by the Oregon Retirement Savings Board. For more information on OregonSaves’ Portfolios go to saver.oregonsaves.com. Account balances in OregonSaves will vary with market conditions and are not guaranteed or insured by the Oregon Retirement Savings Board, the State of Oregon, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other organization.

OregonSaves is a completely voluntary retirement program and investing in a Roth IRA will not be appropriate for all individuals. Employer facilitation of OregonSaves should not be considered an endorsement or recommendation by your employer of OregonSaves or Roth IRA investments. Roth IRAs are not exclusive to OregonSaves and can be obtained outside of the program and contributed to outside of payroll deduction. Contributing to an OregonSaves Roth IRA through payroll deduction offers some tax benefits and consequences. You should consult your tax or financial advisor if you have any tax or financial related questions.

Joel Metlen
Public Engagement Manager, OregonSaves

Oregon State Treasury
503.559.4154

Joel.metlen@ost.state.or.us
www.oregonsaves.com


ODOT ANNOUNCEMENT
US 26 Highway Paving Project
NW Glencoe Road to Mile Post 53


VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION FOR 2016

Thursday,  April 13, 2017 at 6:30 pm

Jessie Mays Community Hall
30975 NW Hillcrest St.
North Plains, Oregon 97133

Presented by the City of North Plains and the North Plains Events Association

Free traditional spaghetti dinner!

Groups will be recognized for their volunteer efforts.
The 2016 Volunteer of the Year and Lifetime Achievement awards will also be presented.

Information at: http://npfun.org/volunteer-dinner


SALMONBERRY TRAIL PROJECT

The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) and Tillamook Forest Heritage Trust (TFHT) invite you to participate in a workshop to gather local input for development of a strategic marketing plan for the Salmonberry Trail project.  This plan will refine the identity of the trail, identify the full range of potential trail users, markets and strategies to reach them, and establish unified messaging for the trail.  It will serve as the foundation for future marketing and promotion of the trail by a variety of local and regional organizations.

The communities along this 86-mile long trail are unique, and we need your input and local knowledge to assure the trail marketing strategy is something that will work for you and meet local needs.  We would also like to learn from you what has worked best in terms of marketing your community or region in the past, and what additional opportunities may exist that can be realized through the Salmonberry Trail project.

We will be holding three workshops in Tillamook and Washington Counties the week of April 10, and hope that you are able to join us at one.  Here are the details on when and where you can participate:

  • Monday, April 10, 1:00 – 4:00 P.M. @ Banks City Hall, Council Chambers
  • Thursday, April 13, 1:00 – 4:00 P.M. @ North County Recreation District Community Building, Schoolhouse Room, in Nehalem
  • Friday, April 14, 9:00 A.M. – Noon @ TBCC’s Partners for Rural Innovation Building, Room 107, in Tillamook

The workshops will be facilitated by staff from HUEN LLC of Portland, who are working on behalf of STIA and TFHT to develop the strategic marketing plan.  This work is being supported by a matching grant from Travel Oregon.

In addition to getting your input for the strategic marketing plan, we will also share information at each workshop on key work that has been taking place on the project, and what will be happening next.

Please spread the word to others in your community about these workshops.  If you know of other individuals or organizations in your area who are interested in the tourism and economic development potential of the Salmonberry Trail project, please forward this invitation on to them.  To enable us to better plan for the number of folks coming to the workshops, we would appreciate an RSVP by email response if you plan to attend.  Hope to see you at one of these gatherings!

Ross Holloway, Executive Director
Tillamook Forest Heritage TrusT
503-945-7318 (office)
503-812-4056 (cell)
ross.holloway@oregon.gov


NOMINATIONS FOR THE UPCOMING DIRECTOR ELECTIONS

http://northplainschamber.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/NPCC-2017-Director-Nomination-Form.pdf

All written nominations must be received by the Nominations Committee Chairman by 12:00 noon on the day of the Regular Membership Meeting, Tuesday, April 11, 2017.  Verbal nominations will be accepted only at the Regular Membership Meeting, Tuesday, April 11, 2017. 

If you have any questions about the nominating and election process, please contact the Nominating Committee Chair: Wayne Holm


ST. EDWARD CATHOLIC CHURCH
COLUMBARIUM ADDED IN NORTH PLAINS CEMETERY

A columbarium has been added to the St. Edward Cemetery.  Contact Tony Montes via the church office at 503-647-2131. The cemetery is located at 12185 Shadybrook Road, North Plains.


NEW EXHIBIT: TIMBER IN THE TUALATIN VALLEY

We are proud to announce that “Timber in the Tualatin Valley” is our new permanent exhibit, sponsored by Stimson Lumber Company! With many original artifacts on loan from local collector Bill Racine, this display aims to teach visitors about the history of logging in Washington County, from the first pioneers to railroading to gas-powered engines.

Much of the local ancestry here tracks back to the loggers of the old days, who carved out this area for homesteads and town sites beginning in the 1860s. Learn about the dangers of the job and what camp life was like for loggers through the tools they used in the woods! Feel what it is like to lay on a straw mattress in the bunkhouse, take a funny photo in our head-in-a-hole logger cutout, and learn about the area on our touch screen mapping program. Check out our calendar for upcoming talks about the industry as well! The Museum is located at Hillsboro Civic Center, (2nd floor above Starbucks), 120 E Main Street, Hillsboro.www.washingtoncountymuseum.org


GERALDI’S WEST PIZZA IS NOW TENITY’S PIZZA AND SUBS

Stop by to see their menu or call for ordering 503-647-5761.
10395 NW Glencoe Road, Suite 600, North Plains, Oregon 97133


North Plains Public Library
Library Buzz-January 2017


Washington County Visitor’s Association
The Tualatin Valley Explorer-Winter 2017


The Banks Lumber Company has sold their mill to Hampton Lumber Company.

Thursday, Hampton Lumber advised the Banks Chamber of Commerce that they will be interviewing the month of January, 2017, for 30 mill workers.  For more information, call 503.324.2681.


Abbey Creek Vineyard and Winery

Read all about Bertony Faustin’s documentary chronicling the stories of minorities in Oregon’s wine industry in the
Hillsboro Tribune.


“It’s lights, camera, action for Oregon’s only black winemaker.”

| | Print

The rapper Notorious B.I.G. plays in the background as Bertony Faustin sits at a table in his North Plains workspace.His T-shirt displays a large Batman insignia. He’s

wearing sweatpants and a baseball cap. And he’s all smiles.

Meet Oregon’s only African American wine maker.

Faustin is the owner and operator at Abbey Creek Vineyard in North Plains, a small winery with big aspirations.

Faustin is hard at work on “Red, White and Black,” a documentary about minorities working in Oregon’s largely white wine industry.

“It’s about representing black and brown folks, women, the LGBT community,” Faustin said. “At the end of the day it’s not a documentary about wine.”

The documentary is currently in the editing stage and is expected to be shown at film festivals starting next year.

At Abbey Creek, in addition to rap music and cool T-shirts, “visitors are likely to find the wines — which bear names like “Juicy Fruit” and “Diva — paired with hot sauces from Brazil.

It’s not your typical tasting room experience, Faustin admits. Nor is it supposed to be.

“This is me,” he said. “This is who we are.”

Luck and hustle

HILLSBORO TRIBUNE PHOTO: CHASE ALLGOOD - Bertony Faustin decided to make wine after the death of his father. Hed never tasted wine before deciding to make it his career.

HILLSBORO TRIBUNE PHOTO: CHASE ALLGOOD

Bertony Faustin decided to make wine after the death of his father. He had never tasted wine before deciding to make it his career.

Faustin never wanted to make wines. In fact, he’d never tasted one before he started his own winery a decade ago.Faustin opened Abbey Creek Vineyard in 2007. A former anesthesia technician at Oregon Health & Science University hospital in Portland, he said he needed a change of scenery after the death of his father that year.

“I came back from his funeral and realized it was time to do something different,” he said.

His in-laws grew grapes on 50 acres along Germantown Road, but they didn’t make wine.

“I thought, ‘You know what? I’m going to start making wine.’ Fortunately for me I was too naive to know how much work it took.”

Faustin enrolled in a winemaking course at Chemeketa Community College for a semester, but said he learned most of the job by doing it.

“It was a hustle,” Faustin said. “I’ll take luck and hustle any day. It’s been great for us. We’ve found our niche.”

Five years ago, he opened a tasting room in North Plains.

It’s an upscale winery in what he calls “a Coors Light town,” but that’s one of the things that attracted Faustin to the area. He likes to turn things on their head.

“Sure, there are days when I am the only ‘brother’ in North Plains, but all our lives we’ve been odd man out and uncomfortable in our scenario,” he said.

HILLSBORO TRIBUNE PHOTO: CHASE ALLGOOD - Bertony Faustin has big plans for his small winery. He wants to work with inner city youth to get them interested in wine, is taking part in a wine-making reality series and has plans to start a second label soon.

HILLSBORO TRIBUNE PHOTO: CHASE ALLGOOD

Bertony Faustin has big plans for his small winery. He wants to work with inner city youth to get them interested in wine, is taking part in a wine-making reality series and has plans to start a second label soon.

Few black-owned wineries in America

Faustin is a member of a very small club.

He’s the only black winemaker based in the state, according to officials at the Oregon Wine Board, a state agency which markets researches and promotes Oregon wines.

Abbey Creek is one of only a few dozen African American-owned wineries in the U.S.

Faustin said he’s not sure why more people of color don’t join the wine industry, but suggested it likely has its roots in wine’s earliest days.

“It started as a European thing,” Faustin said. “For most African Americans, it wasn’t part of our wheelhouse, and that persists to this day.”

Some of it might lie in marketing from the wine industry, Faustin said.

“When people say ‘wine,’ they think ‘high class, pretentious,’” Faustin said. “But a Fred Meyer wine buyer I know does $50,000 a month in sales of boxed wine. That’s the real palate. It’s not fancy.”

The wine industry hasn’t made the African American demographic a priority, either, he said.

“Look at any wine book, any wine press, and you won’t see black faces. You won’t see brown faces. That has kept it out of reach for many,” he said.

Faustin’s documentary, which began as a Kickstarter project last year, tells the story of Oregon’s popular wine industry through the voices of winemakers who don’t fit the image of a typical vintner.

Those faces include Jesus Guillen of Guillen Family Wines in Dayton, the state’s first Mexican-American winemaker. Another, Remy Drabken of Remy Wines in McMinnville, is a lesbian.

Faustin has no plans to slow down.

“It’s always about what’s next,” he said.

Later this month, Faustin will begin filming episodes for a wine-based reality show that pits Oregon winemakers against their counterparts in California.

He’s also working with local organizations to bring kids from the inner city out to his winery.

“I call it Ghetto 4-H,” he said. “I want to show them things that they won’t see otherwise. Children are the future and I truly believe that. I was fortunate to have the support of my family and my wife. Other kids don’t have that.”

If the documentary proves successful, Faustin has more installments in mind.

“I see sequels to the documentary,” he said. “We’re telling the Oregon wine story, but there’s the Oregon coffee story, the Oregon film story. I’m already looking ahead to what the next industry is that we need to focus on and highlight. It doesn’t end.”

Since announcing the documentary six months ago, Faustin has seen a positive impact on his business.

“I’ve seen more black faces in here in the past six months than I’ve seen in four years,” he said. “It’s opening that door to something that we once thought was available to us.”

After his story was picked up by the Associated Press earlier this year, he started receiving messages and phone calls from across the country.

“They said the story was empowering them to do what they’d always wanted to do,” he said.

That’s the message he wants to spread.

“You do you,” said Faustin. “Own who you are. If you do that, everything else falls into place.”

HILLSBORO TRIBUNE PHOTO: CHASE ALLGOOD - Bertony Faustin, owner of Abbey Creek Vineyard in North Plains in Oregon's only black winemaker. He is working on a documentary chronicling the stories of minorities in Oregons wine industry.

HILLSBORO TRIBUNE PHOTO: CHASE ALLGOOD

Bertony Faustin, owner of Abbey Creek Vineyard in North Plains in Oregon’s only black winemaker. He is working on a documentary chronicling the stories of minorities in Oregon’s wine industry.

Join Abbey Creek Vineyard and Winery On Facebook!


Annual Reader’s Choice

The Forest Grove News-Times has announced their Annual Reader’s Choice.
North Plains has received TWO First Place Choices:
Best Annual Event: North Plains Elephant Garlic Festival
Best Christmas Tree Farm: Loch Lolly Christmas Forest

Congratulations to the City of North Plains, the North Plains Event Association and Loch Lolly Christmas Forest.


North Plains Machining Firm Doubles Workforce

Spiering, who maintained ownership of Valley Machine’s land and buildings following the sale, cooperated with Arch Global in the expansion because he considers it a good opportunity for North Plains.

“This is a model that provides jobs for people to exist in the community,” said Spiering. “People can actually work and live in the same area.”

Russ Sheldon, president of the North Plains Chamber of Commerce, called the expansion an important step for North Plains. “It’s a win when you get to retain a business with these good-paying jobs,” he said.

The expansion is currently in the planning and permitting stage, which Spiering said can take upwards of six months to complete. Without any complications, he said, the expansion should be completed in April 2017.

Andy Spiering, Valley Machine’s general manager, corroborated that the expansion is an investment in the North Plains community.

“We’re keeping the jobs local,” he said, “and bringing new ones in to North Plains.”

He also praised the area’s several standout machining and industrial programs, including PCC’s machining courses and Glencoe High School’s robotics program, which he considers especially rigorous.

“It’s a great program,” he said. “We’ve hired kids from it before.”

Sheldon agreed that North Plains has a wealth of skilled labor.

“There are folks who are skilled here,” he said, which is one reason why North Plains is an appealing destination for businesses. Other benefits, he said, include “available land, the proximity to the metro area, no commute.”

Ultimately, said Tony Spiering, the investment in Valley Machine is an investment in North Plains.

“It’s about building a community where people can work and live … socialize.”

Sheldon echoed the sentiment.

“The vitality of any community relies on its businesses,” he said. “Our small businesses are our backbone, and we have growth on the way.”